Tomatoes

Our tomatoes are picked under the watchful eye of our most experienced supervisors. We closely monitor plant growth and choose the prime moment for harvest. Our tomatoes must be at their peak of size, colour, sweetness, and flavour before our experts allow the harvest to begin.

Only the ripest tomatoes are harvested from the vine, chosen for their colour, weight, firmness and fragrance, so that they meet the expectations of even the most fussy shopper.

Unlike some other farmers who pick their tomatoes when they are green, and then gas them with ethylene to induce and accelerate ripening, our tomatoes are allowed to fully ripen on the vine. This method produces exceptional flavour and consistent quality all year-round!

Roma (Egg Tomatoes)


Also called Plum, Italian or saladette tomato, cylinder-shaped smaller tomatoes with meaty insides for making pastes and/or sauces.
Roma tomatoes are ideal for bottling sauces, and removing the skin once cooked is easy with the use of a sieve. They are also increasingly used in salads due to their delicious flavour, easier to manage than larger tomatoes and they tend to keep better when stored as left overs! This variety has a very good size and uniformity and excellent firmness. Our field-grown roma tomatoes are generally available from December to May.



Good-quality roma tomatoes will be firm, smooth-skinned and be at least pink in color. Tomatoes that are partially green will ripen if left at room temperature. Unripe tomatoes should be stored out of direct sunlight at room temperature until ripe for 3 or 4 days. Ripe tomatoes should be used within a day or two. Only refrigerate fully ripened tomatoes, but be aware that it will affect the flavor! Avoid product that is too soft, wrinkled, brown or blotchy, or that has broken skin.

Gourmet Field-grown Tomatoes


This is the tomato you remember eating from your grandfather’s garden! This tomato has a deep rich red colour, is firm and has a delicious flavour. Good in gazpachos, sauces or as a side vegetables. Serve plain, sliced or in wedges, or sprinkled with vinaigrette – ideal for using in salads. It produces a globe to deep oblate shaped fruit and a very tidy stem scar, has a uniform green shoulder, and is very firm when red.


Vine-ripened greenhouse tomatoes


This is the tomato you remember eating from your grandfather’s garden! This tomato has a deep rich red colour, is firm and has a delicious flavour. Good in gazpachos, sauces or as a side vegetables. Serve plain, sliced or in wedges, or sprinkled with vinaigrette – ideal for using in salads. It produces a globe to deep oblate shaped fruit and a very tidy stem scar, has a uniform green shoulder, and is very firm when red.


Tomato Nutrition information

Tomato Nutrition information

Tomatoes are very low in calories and fats. They are a rich source of dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins and are highly recommended in cholesterol controlling and weight reduction programs. They are also good source of folate, iron, calcium, manganese and other minerals. Fresh tomato is very rich in potassium. Potassium in an important component of cell and body fluids, helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure.

Tomatoes contain very good levels of vitamin A, and flavonoid anti-oxidants such as alpha and beta carotenes, xanthin and lutein. The antioxidants present in tomatoes are found to be protective against many cancers including colon, prostate, breast, endometrial, lung, and pancreatic cancers. They are also good source of antioxidant vitamin-C (provide 21% of recommened daily levels per 100 g); consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful free radicals.

Phytochemicals present in tomatoes like Lycopene and carotenoids have the ability to help protect cells and other structures in the body from oxygen free radicals. Red varieties of tomatoes are especially rich in the most powerful flavonoid antioxidant lycopene. Studies have shown that lycopene protects skin damage from UV rays and from prostate cancer. Zeaxanthin, another flavonoid compuond, helps protect eyes from “age related macular disease” (ARMD) in the elderly persons by filtering harmful ultra-violet rays.















Once established in the soil, plants should be allowed to grow for a couple of weeks before applying fertilisers such as nitrogen. Only use nitrogen in the initial growth stages because too much will deny the plant of good fruit set. A fertiliser higher in potassium should be used in later stages of growth to encourage fruiting.

Be careful to watch for blossom end rot – usually due to lack of water or calcium.

If the leaves of the plant are yellowing or fading, or if the tips are black or purple, then the plants are hungry and are lacking in nutrients. Also don’t overfeed the plant as this will cause it to become too green and soft and therefore become more susceptible to wind and insect damage.

Water the plant at regular intervals as they require frequent watering to establish good growth and fruit set. Stress due to lack of water will reduce the quality and yield, and ultimately shorten the life of the plant. Watering requirement will depend on the weather as well as the soil conditions. If it rains then water less frequently. If it is a clay soil, you will not need to water as much as a garden with a sandy soil. Don’t wet the leaves in the late afternoon, as wet leaves during the cold of night can cause fungal or bacterial problems.

Staking or creating a trellis should be done early, to prevent damaging the roots. It is important not to miss that first tying up of the plant, as it tends to droop down and get a kink in it, which it never seems to grow out of and you lose that nice straight stem that you started off with.

Pruning the first few shoots allows the airflow through the plant and keeps the bottom plant clean. Don’t remove the shade leaves as they protect the plant from sun scolding.